Topic: Death of Duress Systems

Day: Thursday 22 October 2020

Time:  2:10pm-2:30pm AESDT

Abstract:

Recent advances in cloud computing have powered Artificial Intelligence (AI) growth and manipulation of big data. These advances occurred in parallel with the advent of intelligent homes. Consequently, the aged care sector can overcome inherent limitations in duress systems and may ultimately lead to the death of the pendant as the primary device for independent living.  Recent advances in cloud computing have powered Artificial Intelligence (AI) growth and manipulation of big data. These advances occurred in parallel with the advent of intelligent homes. Consequently, the aged care sector can overcome inherent limitations in duress systems and may ultimately lead to the death of the pendant as the primary device for independent living.  
Duress in independent living has well understood limitations. Comprehensive studies confirm that:1. A large percentage of aged people with pendants do not wear the device2. One study showed up to 78% of people who fell did not use the alarm3. There is resistance to implementing duress systems due to a variety of reasons4. Traditional pendants are limited by range, i.e. they only work when the person is within their own home.Pendants and other forms of duress provide a level of security and reassurance for many aged people but are only effective when utilised consistently. More importantly, they are not an effective prevention solution, they are only effective post- event.
Advances in technology now offer solutions addressing these issues for a wider cohort and providing opportunities to prevent incidents, while enabling detection of incidents if someone is unable to call for assistance. 
This technology delivers:1. smart sensors data combined with AI to profile normal activity, 2. information enabling proactive interventions avoiding adverse events,3. capabilities for advanced analytics to leverage data, detect events, and raise alerts, 4. core mechanisms that remove the need for an aged person to call for assistance, and5. the ability to add-on connected wearables that imbed pendant functionality along with health sensors to provide incident response, regardless of location.
What does the future hold? 
Cloud computing and data transfer technology is progressing at a rapid rate, which will unlock solutions previously discarded as too hard or expensive.  This is driving significant investment in health and aged care sectors, with revenues from remote patent monitoring expected to exceed $40b AUD globally by 2020.  The key question for service providers is to understand their options to avoid being locked into a vendor or proprietary technology. They must also de-risk issues associated with a consumer devices where obsolescence is designed into products. 
Practical Implementation
Research into intelligent homes and smart devices has identified benefits this technology provides to an individual’s health and wellbeing, resulting in deferring or completely avoiding costs associated with high-end aged care. The challenge is the practical application of technology within a person’s home, how can this be achieved affordably, without impacting on lifestyle or requiring behavioural change.  
Unlocking a 10-year journey
Developing smart sensor solutions for detecting or preventing incidents has been underway for over 10 years. However, only recent advances in technology have enabled cost-effective, practical solutions that directly improve the quality and responses of care to ageing persons. The benefits arising from integration, support for big data and advanced analytics brings the sector to the cusp of a new wave for service delivery.

Biography:

Mike is a founder of InteliCare and has over 25 years of industry experience ranging from analyst to lead consultant to head of information and communication technology for a $3.5 billion mining project. During his career, he has defined and managed programs of work valued up to $200 million, project teams of up to 50 people and worked with executive and board level stakeholders of tier 1 corporates, including Inpex, Woodside Energy and Asia Iron.
He has held a senior consultant role at Empired Ltd, a leading systems integrator, managed the information technology for a Perth International Airport and delivered significant infrastructure projects and been a senior architect for international oil and gas companies. Mike has co-founded three successful information and communication technology companies.